© Dieter Lukas

Corina Logan
Leverhulme Early Career Research Fellow
Department of Zoology
University of Cambridge
itsme@CorinaLogan.com

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Download a PDF of my CV



 

© Jolyon Troscianko
New Caledonian crow using a stick tool








© Pablo Leautaud
Male great-tailed grackle foraging in Mexico
















© Markus Port
Giving a talk at ISBE, Perth, Australia, 2010








© Adam Lewis
Female great-tailed grackle foraging from a garbage can in Santa Barbara








© Adam Lewis
Female great-tailed grackle scrounging at a cafe in Santa Barbara








© Richard Ditch
Male great-tailed grackle








© Ira G. Federspiel
Jackdaws contact sitting








© Corina Logan
Juvenile coatis playing at La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica, 2004








© Sonia Fernandez
Female great-tailed grackle at the Santa Barbara Zoo








© Corina Logan
Great-tailed grackle skulls on a CT scanner bed








© Corina Logan
Red deer skull in the UK








© Corina Logan
Female great-tailed grackle bathing








© Corina Logan
Female great-tailed grackle on palm








© Corina Logan
Female great-tailed grackle in water








© Corina Logan
Female great-tailed grackle








© Corina Logan
Male great-tailed grackle calling








© Corina Logan
Male great-tailed grackle eating next to a sign that says "Do not feed the birds"








© Corina Logan
Male great-tailed grackle investigating a ketchup packet








© Corina Logan
Male great-tailed grackle








© Orquidea Real
Future of Zoology talk at the Department of Zoologyís 150th Anniversary at the University of Cambridge








© Orquidea Real
Panelist in the Just a marmot science game show at the Department of Zoologyís 150th Anniversary at the University of Cambridge








© Orquidea Real
Audience reaction to Just a marmot at the Department of Zoologyís 150th Anniversary at the University of Cambridge








© Claudia Wascher
Teaching an undergraduate lab practical on measuring brain size at Anglia Ruskin University in Cambridge








© The Naked Scientists
Researchers representing their animals in the Amazing Animals contest hosted by The Naked Scientists








© The Naked Scientists
A brave volunteer attempts to solve the water tube test in the Amazing Animals show hosted by The Naked Scientists

PUBLICATIONS    (* = undergraduate co-author)

  • Logan CJ, Avin S, Boogert N, Buskell A, Cross FR, Currie A, Jelbert S, Lukas D, Mares R, Navarrete AF, Shigeno S, Montgomery SH. 2017. Beyond Brain Size. bioRxiv 145334. Submitted to Comparative Cognition & Behavior Reviews.
    1. Logan CJ. 2017. We can shift academic culture through publishing choices [version 2; referees: 2 approved, 1 approved with reservations]. F1000Research 6:518 (doi:10.12688/f1000research.11415.2). Access the recommendation on F1000Prime

    2. Mikhalevich I, Powell R, Logan CJ. 2017. Is behavioural flexibility evidence of cognitive complexity? How evolution can inform comparative cognition. Interface Focus 7:20160121.

    3. Logan CJ, Kruuk L, Stanley R, Thompson A, Clutton-Brock TH. 2016. Endocranial volume is heritable and is associated with longevity and fitness in a wild mammal. Royal Society Open Science 3:160622. Data + some R code

    4. Miller R, Logan CJ, *Lister K, Clayton NS. 2016. Eurasian jays do not copy the choices of conspecifics, but they do show evidence of stimulus enhancement. PeerJ 4:e2746. Preprint - Data + R code

    5. Logan CJ. 2016. Behavioral flexibility in an invasive bird is independent of other behaviors. PeerJ 4:e2215. doi:10.7717/peerj.2215. Preprint - Data + R code

    6. Logan CJ. 2016. How far will a behaviourally flexible invasive bird go to innovate? Royal Society Open Science 3:160247. doi:10.1098/rsos.160247. Data

    7. Logan CJ. 2016. Behavioral flexibility and problem solving in an invasive bird. PeerJ 4:e1975. doi:10.7717/peerj.1975. Preprint - Data

    8. Logan CJ, *Harvey B, Schlinger BA, Rensel M. 2016. Western scrub-jays do not appear to attend to functionality in Aesopís Fable experiments. PeerJ 4:e1707. doi:10.7717/peerj.1707. Preprint - Data

    9. Logan CJ, *Breen AJ, Taylor AH, Gray RD, Hoppitt WJE. 2016. How New Caledonian crows solve novel foraging problems and what it means for cumulative culture. Learning & Behavior 44:18-28. doi: 10.3758/s13420-015-0194-x ESM1 - ESM2 - Data

    10. Logan CJ, *Palmstrom CR. 2015. Can endocranial volume be estimated accurately from external skull measurements in great-tailed grackles (Quiscalus mexicanus)? PeerJ 3:e1000. doi:10.7717/peerj.1000. Preprint - Data

    11. Logan CJ, Jelbert SA, *Breen AJ, Gray RD, Taylor AH. 2014. Modifications to the Aesopís Fable paradigm change performances in New Caledonian crows. PLOS ONE 9(7):e103049. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0103049.

    12. Logan CJ. 2014. Making progress in non-human mental time travel. Frontiers in Psychology 5:305. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2014.00305.

    13. OíDonnell S, Kumar A, Logan C. 2014. Do Nearctic migrant birds compete with residents at army ant raids? A geographic and seasonal analysis. Wilson Journal of Ornithology 126(3):474-487.

    14. Carter AJ, Horrocks NPC, Huchard E, Logan CJ, Lukas D, MacLeod KJ, Marshall HH, Peck HL, Sanderson J, Sorensen M. 2014. Junior scientists are sceptical of sceptics of open access. Trends in Plant Science 20:1-2. doi: 10.1016/j.tplants.2014.04.005.

    15. Logan CJ, Clutton-Brock TH. 2013. Validating methods for estimating endocranial volume in individual red deer (Cervus elaphus). Behavioural Processes 92:143-146. doi:10.1016/j.beproc.2012.10.015. Data

    16. Logan CJ, Ostojic Lj, Clayton NS. 2013. Rook, but not jackdaw, post-conflict third-party affiliation reduces aggression for aggressors. Ethology 119:1-9. doi: 10.1111/eth.12078. Data

    17. Logan CJ, Emery NJ, Clayton NS. 2013. Alternative behavioral measures of corvid post-conflict affiliation. Behavioral Ecology 24:98-112. doi: 10.1093/beheco/ars140.

    18. Logan CJ, Longino JT. 2013. Adult male coatis play with a band of juveniles. Brazilian Journal of Biology 73:353-355. doi: 10.1590/S1519-69842013000200015.

    19. OíDonnell S, Logan C, Clayton NS. 2012. Specializations of birds that attend army ant raids: an ecological approach to cognitive and behavioral studies. Behavioural Processes 91(3):267-274. doi:10.1016/j.beproc.2012.09.007.

    20. Logan CJ, OíDonnell S, Clayton NS. 2011. A case of mental time travel in ant-following birds? Behavioral Ecology 22(6):1149-1153. doi: 10.1093/beheco/arr104. BBC Nature AnimalWise OUP Blog

    21. OíDonnell, S, Kumar, A, Logan, C. 2010. Army ant raid attendance and bivouac-checking behavior by Neotropical montane forest birds. Wilson Journal of Ornithology 122(3):503-512.

    22. Logan, CJ, Montero, C. 2009. Bothrops asper (Terciopelo) scavenging behavior. Herpetological Review 40(3):352.

    23. Logan, CJ, Pepper, JW. 2007. Social learning is central to innovation, in primates and beyond. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30:416-417. doi: 10.1017/S0140525X07002476.


    PUBLICATIONS (non-peer reviewed)
    1. Powell R, Mikhalevich I, Logan CJ, Clayton NS. 2017. Convergent minds: the evolution of cognitive complexity in nature. Interface Focus 7:20170029. doi: 10.1098/rsfs.2017.0029.


    GRANTS
    2016 Cambridge Graduate School of Life Sciences Researcher Development Grant
    To fund two Exercise your interview skills workshops for PhD students and postdocs
    £1,250 (declined)
    2015 Cambridge Graduate School of Life Sciences Researcher Development Grant
    Funded an Exercise your interview skills workshop for PhD students and postdocs
    £718
    2015-2018 Leverhulme Early Career Fellowship / Newton Trust salary + research £123,000
    2014 University of California Santa Barbara Open Access Pilot Fund Program
    Covered publication fees for Logan et al. (2014) in PLoS ONE
    $1,350
    2013-2014 National Geographic Society / Waitt Grant
    Funded the field research on New Caledonian crows and great-tailed grackles
    $14,172
    2012-2015 Junior Research Fellowship, SAGE Center for the Study of the Mind, UCSB salary + research $144,000
    2010-2011 Cambridge Philosophical Society Travel Grants (conferences) £685
    2009-2011 Gates Cambridge Trust Research Grants (conferences) £2,111
    2009-2011 Murray Edwards College Research and Travel Grants (conferences) £895
    2008-2011 Gates Cambridge Scholarship (50 awarded out of 600 applicants)
    Funded my PhD fees, living costs, and stipend at the University of Cambridge
    £75,000
    2008-2011 Murray Edwards College International Bursary £3,000
    2004 Youth Activity Grant, The Explorers Club (undergrad research) $1,050
    2003-2004 Foundation Activity Grants, The Evergreen State College $353
    2003-2004 K.E.Y. Student Services Award, The Evergreen State College $3,750
    2002-2003 Academic Achievement Award, The Evergreen State College $900
    2000-2001 Ann Richards Scholarship, Skagit Valley College $300
    2000-2001 Clark Scholarship, Skagit Valley College $900
    1998 AmeriCorps Education Award $4,725


    AWARDS
    2016-2018 Post-doctoral Bye Fellow, Murray Edwards College, University of Cambridge
    2016 Learning & Behavior Best Article Award $1,000
    2014-2016 Elected to the Excellence in Science Program,
    American Association for the Advancement of Science
    2011 Best Talk (out of 12), Murray Edwards College Graduate Symposium £50
    2009 Science Writing Prize, Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour & New Scientist £1,000
    2009 2nd prize Best Student Talk (out of 50), International Ethological Congress £40
    2007 & 2008 NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program Honorable Mention
    2002 Intern of the Year, Northwest Ecosystem Alliance
    2002 Graduated with high honors and the Presidentís Medal (top 1.8%), grades (GPA): 3.91/4.00,
    Skagit Valley College
    2001-2003 Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society Member
    2001-2002 Drama Department Award, Skagit Valley College
    2000-2001 National Deanís List
    1999-2000 Drama Student of the Year, Skagit Valley College


    PRESS COVERAGE & PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT

      2014

    • Are crows smarter than a first-grader? UCSB news release
    • Are crows smarter than children? National Geographic Weird & Wild
    • NewsTalk radio interviews on crow research: Futureproof (26 July, starts at 25:20) and Moncrieff show (29 July, starts at 36:52)
    • I'm quoted in MacLean's Don't call them bird brains
    • How birds learn about and solve foraging problems. Talk at the Sedgwick Reserve, Santa Ynez (Dec)
    • How New Caledonian crows learn about and solve foraging problems. Talk at the Audubon Society, Santa Barbara (Oct)
    • Santa Barbara Zoo talks: Why study bird cognition?, Social cognition in birds, Physical cognition in birds

      2010

    • Does social support reduce stress in corvids? Talk at the Global Scholars Symposium, University of Cambridge (Jun)
    • What corvids do after a fight. Talk at the Murray Edwards College Graduate Symposium, University of Cambridge (Apr)

      2009

    • Social support in corvids. Talk at the Gates Scholars Symposium, University of Cambridge (Sep)
    • The evolution and ontogeny of post-conflict third-party affiliation in corvids. Talk at the Keio-Cambridge Symposium, University of Cambridge (Aug)



    POPULAR SCIENCE ARTICLES
    • Logan CJ, Emery NJ, Clayton NS. 2011. Squabbles and snuggles: how corvids handle conflict. Natural History Magazine, June, pp. 18-19.


    CONFERENCE POSTERS
    • Endocranial volume is heritable and associated with fitness in deer. International Society for Behavioral Ecology, Exeter, Aug 2016
    • Investigating New Caledonian crow causal cognition using water displacement experiments. International Society for Behavioral Ecology, NY, Aug 2014
    • Are small brains capable of sophisticated cognition? Summer Institute on Bounded Rationality, Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Berlin, Jul 2012.
    • Behavioural contagion in rooks and jackdaws. Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour, London, Dec 2010.
    • Behavioural contagion in rooks and jackdaws. Learning, decision making and evolutionary theory: can we bridge the gap? An international workshop of the Israel Science Foundation, Kfar Blum, Israel, Nov 2010.


    INVITED TALKS
    • The walls of my invisible box. The Pivot Point event on how to change academic culture. University of Cambridge Graduate Union, Jun 2017 [Event] [Slides]
    • How to make your voice heard. eLife #ECRWednesday webinar, May 2017 [Video]
    • Behavioral flexibility and brain size in birds. Archbold Research Station, Florida, Apr 2017
    • Open peer review: what is it and what does it achieve? How to get the most out of modern peer review, Office of Scholarly Communications, University of Cambridge, Mar 2017 [Video] [Slides]
    • How the Elsevier Big Deal sparked a rampage at Cambridge. Department of Zoology Seminar Day, University of Cambridge, Mar 2017 [Slides]
    • Behavioral flexibility in invasive species. Department of Human Behavior, Ecology and Culture, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Feb 2017
    • On campus action to organize against big deals. OpenCon Community Call, Jan 2017 [Notes]
    • The costs and benefits of a large brain in birds and mammals. Ecology and Evolution Seminar Series, University of York, Jan 2017
    • Behavioral flexibility and brain size in birds and mammals. Technologies and Techniques Seminar Series, Anglia Ruskin University, Dec 2016
    • Researchers are terrible business people. . .but we don't have to be. Zoology Postdoc Seminar Series, University of Cambridge, Jul 2016 [Slides]
    • Merging behavioural ecology, evolution, and ecology to discover: why do brain sizes differ? Leverhulme Trust Board, London, Jun 2016
    • Frustrations with exploitative publishers; open access solutions. Part of a discussion to develop an open research policy for the University of Cambridge. Office of Scholarly Communications, University of Cambridge, Jun 2016 [Slides] [Resulting report]
    • Behavioral flexibility and problem solving in an invasive bird. Wolfson College Science Society, University of Cambridge, May 2016
    • Behavioral flexibility and brain size in birds and mammals. Zoology, University of Stockholm, May 2016
    • Endocranial volume is heritable and associated with fitness in a wild mammal. Departmental Seminar Day, Zoology, University of Cambridge, Feb 2016
    • Brain size and neuron number in the context of comparative cognition. Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Brunoy, France, Feb 2016
    • Behavioral flexibility in birds and beyond. History and Philosophy of Science, University of Cambridge, Nov 2015
    • Behavioral flexibility in great-tailed grackles. Zoology, University of Cambridge, Oct 2015
    • Behavioral flexibility is not predicted by innovation frequency or brain size in three bird species. School of Biology, University of St Andrews, Jul 2015
    • How birds learn about and solve foraging problems. Center for Behavior, Evolution, and Culture, University of California Los Angeles, Feb 2015 [Video]
    • How birds learn about and solve foraging problems. History and Philosophy of Science Department, Washington University, Dec 2014
    • How birds learn about and solve foraging problems. Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Nov 2014
    • How New Caledonian crows learn about and solve foraging problems. Santa Barbara City College, Sep 2014
    • Causal cognition in New Caledonian crows. Hastings Natural History Reservation, May 2014
    • Causal cognition in New Caledonian crows. Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of California Santa Barbara, Mar & May 2014
    • Physical and social cognition in two innovative bird species. Department of Integrative Biology and Physiology, University of California Los Angeles, Jan 2014
    • Who are you calling a bird brain? Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Nov 2013
    • Conflict management in crows and beyond. National Center for Ecological Analysis, University of California, Santa Barbara, Mar 2013
    • Episodic-like memory in brown-headed cowbirds? Vertebrate Lab Journal Club, University of California Santa Barbara, Feb 2013
    • What to do after a fight? Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of California Santa Barbara, Oct 2012; Department of Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology, Jan 2014
    • Corvid post-conflict affiliation - AND - What influences brain size in red deer? Wild Evolution Group, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK, Apr 2012
    • The sociality, ontogeny, and function of corvid post-conflict affiliation. Sub-Department of Animal Behaviour, University of Cambridge, Nov 2011
    • How corvids support each other after fights. Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Jul 2011
    • The sociality, ontogeny, and function of corvid postconflict affiliation. Institute of Biology, University of Neuchatel, Switzerland, Mar 2011


    CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS
    • Mikhalevich I, Powell R, Logan CJ. Is behavioural flexibility evidence of cognitive complexity? How evolution can inform comparative cognition. International Conference on Comparative Cognition, Melbourne Beach, Florida, 19-22 April 2017.
    • Logan CJ. Behavioral flexibility in an invasive bird is independent of other behaviors. European Conference on Behavioural Biology, Vienna, 12-15 July 2016.
    • Logan CJ. Are invasive species behaviorally flexible? Ethology, Gottingen, Germany, Feb 2016
    • Logan CJ, Breen AJ, Taylor AH, Gray RD, Hoppitt WJE. How New Caledonian crows solve novel foraging problems and what it means for cumulative culture. Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour Winter Meeting, London, UK, 3-4 Dec 2015.
    • Logan CJ. Does innovation frequency indicate complex cognition? Behaviour, Cairns, Australia, 9-14 Aug 2015.
    • Logan CJ. Formalizing a broad post-conflict affiliation hypothesis. For the symposium I organized on Post-conflict affiliation: applications for conflict management in humans. International Ethological Congress, Newcastle, UK, 4-8 Aug 2013.
    • Logan CJ, Emery, NJ, Clayton, NS. The sociality and ontogeny of corvid postconflict affiliation. International Ethological Congress / Animal Behavior Society, Bloomington, IN, USA, 25-31 Jul 2011.
    • Logan CJ, Emery, NJ, Clayton, NS. Does social support reduce stress in corvids? International Society for Behavioral Ecology, Perth, Australia, 26 Sep-3 Oct 2010.
    • Logan CJ, Emery, NJ, Clayton, NS. The evolution and ontogeny of postconflict third-party affiliation in corvids. International Ethological Congress, Rennes, France, 19-25 Aug 2009.


    COMPARATIVE COGNITION LAB MEETING PRESENTATIONS
  • The sociality and ontogeny of postconflict affiliation in corvids (May 2011)
  • Does social support reduce stress in corvids? (Sep 2010)
  • Mental time travel in antbirds? (Dec 2009)
  • Coati play in Costa Rica (Jan 2009)
  • Corvid post-conflict affiliation (Aug 2009 & Jan 2010)



    PUBLIC POSTERS
    • What corvids do after a fight. University of Cambridge Science Festival, Mar 2010.
    • What corvids do after a fight. University of Cambridge Science Festival, Department of Experimental Psychology Open Day, Mar 2010.
    • Play behavior of Nasua narica (white-nosed coati) in Costa Rica. Murray Edwards College Graduate Symposium, University of Cambridge, Apr 2009.
    • Play behavior of Nasua narica (white-nosed coati) in Costa Rica. University of Cambridge's 800th Anniversary Science Festival, Mar 2009.


    OPEN RESEARCH MATERIALS

    EXPERIENCE AND EDUCATION
    2015-2018 Leverhulme Early Career Research Fellow, Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge
  • Conducted the first study on the heritability of endocranial volume (a brain size proxy) in the wild
  • Discovered that endocranial volume is highly heritable and does not influence lifetime breeding success in 1300 red deer
  • Results suggest that endocranial volume heritability estimates in non-natural conditions may be more similar to what occurs in the wild than previously thought
  • 2012-2015 Junior Research Fellow, SAGE Center for the Study of the Mind, University of California Santa Barbara
  • Discovered that New Caledonian crows do not learn by imitating, therefore I suggested a new pathway for the evolution of cumulative technological culture
  • Conducted the first intelligence tests on great-tailed grackles, finding that, contrary to predictions, they are behaviorally flexible similar to crows despite their small relative brain size and lack of published foraging innovations
  • Results suggest that behavioral flexibility is not indicated by brain size or innovation and must be measured directly
  • 2008-2012 PhD Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge (with Prof Nicola Clayton)
  • Investigated the sociality, ontogeny, and function of corvid (birds in the crow family) postconflict affiliation, finding that even the least social species studied so far uses social support
  • Developed new methods to detect postconflict affiliation in strongly bonded individuals
  • 2004-2008 Research Assistant, University of Washington, Stanford University, University of Arizona, Washington State Department of Natural Resources
    2002-2004 BS Biology, The Evergreen State College, USA (with Prof John Longino)
  • Discovered that adult male coatis play with juveniles rather than predate them, which makes them an excellent model for studying the mechanisms of infanticide
  • 1999-2002 AA Degree in Biology and Drama, Skagit Valley College, USA


    TEACHING AND SUPERVISION
    • Teach Neuroethology: The neural basis of adaptive behaviour for final year undergraduates in Zoology at Cambridge (3 lectures; 2016)
    • Co-designed and taught graduate seminars in Psychological and Brain Sciences at UCSB: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Brains and Behavior (2013) and Behavioral science: are you doing it wrong? (2014). Course material was adapted to student interests throughout the term.
    • Developed and delivered a writing workshop for final year students at Cambridge (2009 & 2011).
    • Guest lecturer since 2012: Ethology and Behavioral Ecology (3 lectures - the main lecturer said that my lecture was the most popular in the course every year), Social Psychology of Close Relationships (1 lecture) at UCSB, and Methods in Field Biology (1 lab) and Seminars in Biology (1 lecture) at Santa Barbara City College.
    • Committee member for 4 PhD students and 1 MS student in the UK and US.
    • Supervised 21 undergraduate and 4 high school research assistants at Cambridge and UCSB (since 2009). Advised in how to give talks and poster presentations, and apply for grants and PhD programs.
    • Supervised ~40 undergraduates in Behaviour at Cambridge (2009 & 2011).
    • Demonstrated lab practicals for ~500 undergraduates in Evolution and Behaviour and marked ~15% of their exams at Cambridge (2009-2011).


    EDITOR
    • Associate Editor for Royal Society Open Science (since 2016)
    • Editorial Board member for Animal Behavior & Cognition (since 2017)


    PEER REVIEWER

    Since 2017: I now only review papers at 100% open access journals at ethical publishers where the peer review history will be published alongside the article.

    2011-2016: performed 29 pre-publication reviews for 16 journals: Ethology (6 papers), Behaviour (3), Royal Society Open Science (3), Biology Letters (2), The Quarterly Review of Biology (2), Animal Behaviour (2), PLOS ONE (2), Behavioural Processes (2), Frontiers in Psychology (1), Proceedings of the Royal Society B (1), Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B (1), Current Zoology (1), Avian Research (1), Animal Cognition (1), Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology (1), Behavioral Sciences (1), and for the International Ethological Congress 2013.



    LEADERSHIP

    Organizer:
    • Co-organized: Convergent Minds: The evolution of cognitive complexity in nature, special issue of Interface Focus (2017)
    • Organized and led early career researcher workshop on Moving brain size forward (2017)
    • Postdoc Research Convenor for Murray Edwards College (2017-2018)
    • Member of Journals Coordination Scheme School of Biological Sciences Consultative Committee and serve as the School of Biological Sciences representative on the Journals Coordination Scheme Working Group at Cambridge (2017-2018)
    • Department of Zoology Library Committee at Cambridge (2017-2018)
    • Facilitating shift to ethical scientific publishing (since 2016)
    • Member of OpenConCam (2016-2018), co-organized OpenCon Cambridge Nov 2016
    • Implemented Cambridge-wide interview workshops based on theatre exercises for postgraduate and postdoc researchers (2015)
    • Convened a Zoology networking group (2015-2016)
    • Co-organized two SAGE Junior Research Fellow Workshops: Coordinating the study of social coordination (2014) and The human condition as a network of networks (2013)
    • Launched Psychology Postdocs Happy Hour to network a disconnected community, Santa Barbara (2013-2015)
    • Organized a conference symposium at Behaviour, Newcastle, UK (2013)
    • Gates Cambridge Alumni Association Regional Coordinator (2013)

    Society member: Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour (since 2009), Cambridge Philosophical Society (since 2008), The Ethological Society (since 2016)

    Invited participant:
    • Workshop: Collaborating with men, Murray Edwards College (2016)
    • Research data management focus group, Jisc (Joint Information Systems Committee) and the University of Cambridge (2016)

    Invited discussant: Conference: New Directions in the Evolutionary Social Sciences, Centre for Research in the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities, University of Cambridge (2016)